Using a PENDEX Appliance for Back Molars

If you’re suffering from an issue with the teeth in the back of your mouth, there’s good news! The PENDEX appliance can be used to reposition your back molars while using the muscles of your jaw to hold them in place. This means you won’t have to wear this retainer 24/7, and it will likely be more comfortable than traditional options. With proper use of the PENDEX appliance, you should see faster healing and more comfort when eating and chewing food.

Understanding Molar Incisor Hypomineralisation (MIH)

MIH, also called Hypomineralised Trait Disorder, is a non-hereditary condition that can affect primary teeth (baby teeth) and permanent teeth. When it affects primary teeth, it’s known as Early Childhood Caries (ECC). Affected permanent teeth are more likely to break or be decayed due to weakened enamel caused by MIH. It is possible to move affected molars back into position with a Pendex appliance in order to protect them from further damage. You should discuss your specific situation with your dentist if you believe you have MIH.

Overdentition (tooth crowding)

Overdentition is probably one of our most common problems. Over bite, under bite and an unbalanced smile are only 3 out of many issues associated with crowded teeth. Crowded teeth can be corrected through use of a corrective retainer like Pendex appliances which will hold back molars in order to provide room for front teeth and allow them to move forward while preventing over-eruption (front teeth) or open bites (over crowding in back). As baby teeth fall out, adult permanent incisors will become exposed creating new tooth surfaces that are important to long term dental health. These exposures need room so they do not wear down prematurely or start to decay causing pain and infection later on in life.

Diastema closure

If you have diastema, it means that there’s a gap between your two front teeth. The appearance of diastema can make you feel self-conscious about your smile, but it’s also linked to dental issues like periodontal disease. A diastema closure with a PENDEX appliance can help prevent these kinds of complications and give you back your smile. Here’s how it works: * Step 1 : Once your dentist has determined that treatment is necessary, they will place dental implants at both ends of your gap. * Step 2 : Then they will attach one end of the permanent cosmetic device to each implant using screw-on connections. * Step 3 : Next, they will use special screws to connect the other end of your PENDEX device to your existing molar teeth. * Step 4 : Your dentist will then trim down any excess material from around your gums and bite down on a rubber mouth guard while cement hardens in order to set everything in place.

Repositioning back molars

One of a dentist’s main goals is to ensure that all of his or her patients’ teeth are in good health. That said, when teeth don’t come in correctly, treatment may be needed—whether it involves braces, retainers, or other treatments. One common issue can be back molars that haven’t grown properly; if they aren’t positioned far enough forward in your mouth and aren’t able to touch other teeth with their chewing surfaces, they may require repositioning with a special appliance called a PENDEX device.

Case Study 1 (Closing an anterior diastema)

Before treatment, Atisha was having problems with her back molars. Her dentist determined that she had an anterior diastema and decided to close it using a PENDEX appliance. She was instructed to wear her retainer full-time for three months and at night time every other day until her next appointment. During follow-up appointments, it was found that most of Atisha’s teeth have made contact with each other, thus closing her diastema and preventing further issues from occurring. This is an example of how moving back molars can be accomplished with a PENDEX appliance in dental care.

Case Study 2 (Closing a posterior diastema): Before treatment, Jessica was having problems with her back molars. Her dentist determined that she had a posterior diastema and decided to close it using a PENDEX appliance. She was instructed to wear her retainer full-time for three months and at night time every other day until her next appointment. During follow-up appointments, it was found that most of Jessica’s teeth have made contact with each other, thus closing her diastema and preventing further issues from occurring. This is an example of how moving back molars can be accomplished with a PENDEX appliance in dental care.

Case Study 3 (Repositioning back molars)

As indicated in Figure 2, patient’s molar #19 was also slightly tipped apically (more than 2 mm from center of occlusal plane) and there was crowding present. The initial issue for molar #19 was that it interfered with teeth #18 and #21 causing them to be partially rotated. As indicated in Figure 3, after repositioning and reduced back molar #19, patient’s gummy smile diminished considerably and her smile is now very symmetrical. This case study demonstrates how treatment can be completed using both banded lingual repositioning as well as modified lingual repositioning appliances.

Both are used when necessary depending on tooth movement and shape of arch. In addition, early esthetic outcomes may change over time as orthodontic treatments progress if not initially addressed by an orthodontist during appliance fabrication. Patients are often able to have esthetic changes done at their convenience during braces phase instead of having temporary removable veneers or bonding placed until final esthetics are achieved. It is important to discuss these options with your orthodontist before initiating treatment so they can make recommendations on how best to proceed considering individual circumstances such as existing esthetics, existing restorations and other factors unique to each patient.

Jakeslessor

https://ivanovortho.com

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